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April 26th, 2013
01:20 PM ET

"Piers Morgan Live, Rewind": Nick Paton Walsh on Tsarnaev mother; Bob Baer, Bill Gavin on FBI reaction; Katherine Hern on son's recovery

Whether you fell asleep early, stayed out too late, or simply want to watch it again, we realize it's not always possible to get your entire "Piers Morgan Live" fix from television. As an answer to this, we offer the below labor of love – "Piers Morgan Live, Rewind" – dedicated and designed to getting you caught up and connected to the conversation.

  • Leaving Mother Russia: Tsarnaev mom also on FBI radar

As the investigation into the bombings in Boston continues, on Thursday evening "Piers Morgan Live" invited CNN International correspondent Nick Paton Walsh to share some new information he'd learned as a result of a recent noteworthy interview. Having spoken on the record, and in person, to the mother of alleged bombers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Paton Walsh revealed that the elder son was not the only family member to have gained the attention of the authorities:

"She actually never mentioned – when the FBI came to talk to Tamerlan, her son, because they were, in her words, concerned about his radical Islamic beliefs – that they in fact also expressed an interest in her," Thursday's guest explained to Piers Morgan. "But it would make sense, because the two of them describe how they both went down that devout path pretty much the same time. This character "Misha," a family friend, opening their eyes, in her words, to the correct Islamic path, influencing Tamerlan who then turned to his mother and said 'Mother, it's time to start covering your hair.'"

  • Bob Baer, Bill Gavin: Should the FBI take fall for missed intel?

Meanwhile, Thursday's show also saw Bob Baer and Bill Gavin further address criticism claiming the U.S. didn't sufficiently heed warnings coming out of Russia:

"The question is, putting all these dots together, did the FBI agent in Boston responsible for Tamerlan know that he went to Dagestan? Apparently, according to Homeland Security, the FBI was not pinged when he returned back from Dagestan, as I understand it, which is the failure here," noted Baer, a former CIA operative. "Tamerlan should have been interviewed at Immigrations when he came back. He was a permanent resident alien. He doesn't have the same rights as Americans. He should have been pulled aside, questioned, his documents gone through. If he had a laptop, his address book and the rest of it. So yes, when you have an attack like this, there is some sort of breakdown. This guy was all over the Internet. There's no other way to describe it."

Gavin, meanwhile, offered some details in hopes of explaining why domestic intelligence can be more complicated than many realize:

"The FBI does the backgrounds. They do whatever they can on the computer and what not, and they'll do some interviews. If there's no red flags that go up, this is a very difficult point of view," detailed Gavin, a former Assistant Director of the FBI. "Because there's nothing much they can do. It's a democracy, and they have to be careful about how they handle it."

  • Katherine Hern: Injured son dealing with emotions beyond his years

Additionally, Thursday's hour-long live program saw the host speak with Katherine Hern, the mother of Aaron, a boy injured in the blasts. Only 11 years old, Aaron's last few weeks have forced him to face emotional trauma more appropriate for a boy far beyond his years:

"His reaction ... it's been a lot of things. It was anger and it was a lot of emotion and a lot of sadness," said Hern, joining the show on the phone. "A much more intense feeling than I would normally see from an almost 12-year-old. So it was very hard to see him with that intent of an emotion about something that he's seen and been involved in. It's much too early in life."

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soundoff (5 Responses)
  1. shepherdgregory

    Very struck by that boy's very evident trauma:it's gonna be a long haul,but his mother amazing,and you could wish for a
    million like her.Surprised no other comments on this.

    Where is everyone?

    April 27, 2013 at 12:03 am | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Reinel Cardona

    Why! muslims community of the United States never speak out against the crimes committed against Christians in their countries by muslims?. Only do it when going in America. Is this not double morality?

    April 27, 2013 at 9:32 am | Report abuse | Reply
    • sm

      You have to understand that most other countries dont offer the protection and rights America and other European nations offer their citizens to fair representation, due prosess ( thats very rare), equality. Most countries are starting to see growing Islam and dont understand it. we learnes in the beginning of the 1960's and learned about the differences.

      April 29, 2013 at 5:02 pm | Report abuse | Reply
      • shepherdgregory

        Learn what in the '60s,my chickadee?(Saw your lengthy posts few pages back two in a row:very neat,WATCH the spelling,
        my sweet.)

        April 29, 2013 at 6:15 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Tonda Nigl

    Laptops are common now; everyone's these to decide on school or when they travel for work. They're useful and to maneuver with. What on earth is also common should be to see someone scrambling to discover a place to charge a laptop battery. That report due tomorrow may suddenly be lost if you don't find an outlet within thirty seconds... Or that slideshow you could have created (but carelessly forgot just to save) may disappear should your laptop battery is just not recharged.:"^

    http://www.caramoan.coOur very own web page

    May 24, 2013 at 5:27 pm | Report abuse | Reply

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