Get To Know Piers Morgan

READ about Piers Morgan's long career in journalism here.

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Thank you for watching "Piers Morgan Live" over the years. See below for your favorite memories from 2011-2014.
March 28th, 2014
03:27 PM ET

Politics, Prison, Partisanship, and Piety – A collection of thought-provoking moments from "Piers Morgan Live"

During the course of more than 39 groundbreaking months inside a trademark blue-green studio, Piers Morgan welcomed a diverse combination of headline-grabbing newsmakers, influential religious leaders and political power players.

But as multi-faceted as was his collection of guests, the host's goals always reflected a singular approach: ask thought-provoking questions, tell great stories and share unique perspective.

As such, CNN's 9 p.m. primetime hour regularly made viewers think, occasionally made guests cry and always made for good television.

Now, in honor of his final hours anchoring the show as only he could, it is with great pride and pleasure that we share some of Piers Morgan's most iconic and symbolic interviews.

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Laughs, Lights and Lawrence's Late Arrival – A collection of moments from "Piers Morgan Live"
March 28th, 2014
03:00 PM ET

Laughs, Lights and Lawrence's Late Arrival – A collection of moments from "Piers Morgan Live"

From Oprah to Charlie Sheen, as well as Betty White, Tom Hanks and Ricky Gervais, "Piers Morgan Live" has been a regular stomping ground for names that resonate across households and Hollywood.

In his more than three years as host of CNN's premier interview program, Piers Morgan deftly navigated the fine line between invasive and inquisitive, keeping his A-List guests on their toes, while keeping America on the edge of its proverbial seat.

Now, with no more questions about "proper love" left to be asked, we proudly present a collection of some of his most entertaining and endearing celebrity conversations.
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Tension, Tumult and Tenacity – A collection of moments from "Piers Morgan Live"
March 28th, 2014
02:45 PM ET

Tension, Tumult and Tenacity – A collection of moments from "Piers Morgan Live"

In his more than three years as host of a primetime program on CNN, Piers Morgan never shied away from controversy, never dodged a critique, never sidestepped an emotional exchange.

And as a result, for 39 months, the coveted nine o'clock time slot was home to jaw-dropping explosions, passionate outbursts and raw, powerful questions and confrontations.

Now, as Morgan prepares to leave his iconic blue and green studio behind, we proudly present a collection of some of his most fiery moments.

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March 28th, 2014
02:45 PM ET

Vanessa Williams on Luptia Nyong'o: "An extraordinary example of a young talent and a true beauty"

It's been more than three decades since Vanessa Williams trailblazed her way across the national landscape, capturing the crown as Miss America 1984, in the process becoming the first ever African-American to win the prestigious pageant.

Thirty-one years later, another woman of color has leaped into the hearts of America, as Lupita Nyong'o – born six months before Williams' win – earned the 2014 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, in the process becoming an instant media darling.

Prior to Nyong'o's win at the Oscars, the 31-year-old with dual Kenyan and Mexican citizenship gave an impassioned speech at the annual Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon in California, admitting that as a young girl she prayed for lighter skin, as her dark complexion subjected her to ridicule and feelings of inadequacy.

Admitting to wishing she “would wake up lighter skinned,” the "12 Years A Slave" actress went on to explain how the emergence of model Alek Wek, who like herself boasted skin "dark as night," helped her to embrace her own beauty. FULL POST

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March 21st, 2014
11:01 PM ET

How satellite buoys may be the key to discovering debris from missing Flight 370

It's now been two full weeks since Flight 370 disappeared and questions and theories far outweigh clues and concrete information.

But could the key to solving this mystery be found among satellite-tracked buoys?

Joining "Piers Morgan Live" on Friday evening, Oceanography researcher Luca Centurioni demonstrated how such instruments may aid in the search for debris in the Indian Ocean.

"We have an element which is underwater. We call it a drug. And that will make sure the drifter follows the ocean currents," explained Centurioni, detailing the first element in a three tier process. "Then we have another sensor which is a temperature sensor. It measures the temperature of the water. And then very importantly we have another sensor which is atmospheric pressure sensor ... and what we do, we feed all the data in real time to anyone who can make use of it." FULL POST

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March 20th, 2014
11:45 PM ET

Joe Padilla, whose brother's flight went missing in 2003: "He boarded this plane and then it took off...and no one knows what happened to it"

As the search for debris in the Indian Ocean continues, the families of the passengers of Flight 370 find themselves in a difficult position. While they remain desperate for answers, confirmation of aircraft wreckage would almost certainly mean the loss of loved ones.

Eleven years ago Joe Padilla went through a similar ordeal, as the plane his brother boarded went missing in May of 2003. It hasn't been heard from since.

Joining "Piers Morgan Live" Thursday evening, Padilla shared a bit of his story.

"All I know is the FBI had told me in the beginning, when this happened, that my brother was on a plane," Padilla told Bill Weir, who reprised his role as guest host for a fourth straight evening. "He boarded this plane and then it took off. And no one knows what happened to it."

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March 19th, 2014
12:04 AM ET

Flight 370 puts Israel on high alert: "Israel has close to zero margin for error in countering and protecting itself against a hijacked airplane"

A dozen days into the investigation surrounding missing Flight 370, there are far more questions than there are answers.

However, among the possible theories exists the notion that the aircraft may have been hijacked, with a plan to be used in a terrorist attack.

Among the many nations that could be potential targets within such a scheme, it is perhaps Israel that finds itself most vulnerable, thanks in part to its size and location.

"Israel's a tiny country. It's situated along the coast. A jet that's been hijacked flying at 600 miles an hour will take about a minute and half to cross the entire country of Israel. It's where Israel's most populated cities are right along that coast. So Israel has close to zero margin for error in countering and protecting itself against a hijacked airplane," explained Michael Oren, a former Israeli ambassador to the United States. "If this Malaysian jet has been hijacked, and there's a sense among Israeli intelligence officials that that is a possibility, then Israel feels that it has to take the necessary precautions. The government met with security officials this week and decided on a number of emergency measures." FULL POST

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March 17th, 2014
11:11 PM ET

Might missing Flight 370 have landed, then refueled, in the name of terrorism?

More than a week into the mystery surrounding missing Flight 370, new theories are popping up each day, and with information scarce, nothing feels out of the realm of possibility.

On Monday evening, Bill Weir filled in as "Piers Morgan Live" host, welcoming retired American Airlines pilot Jim Tilmon for a live, primetime interview.

Joining the program via satellite from Phoeniz, Ariz., Tilmon said he wished to "roll something by you," admitting it was "far-fetched" and might sound "crazy."

Searching for answers on behalf of the network and its audience, Weir invited Tilmon to "go ahead, bring it."

Laughing, Tilmon noted that "yeah, I'm going to bring it", before offering his theory.

"What would happen if they did in fact find a way to land, refuel, take off again and then threaten the integrity of certain kinds of structures, structures like the White House, the Eiffel Tower," he wondered. "What if they had threatened those in a 9/11-type approach?"
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Flying Below the Radar with Greg Charvat
From "Small and Short-Range Radar Systems"
March 17th, 2014
05:16 PM ET

Flying Below the Radar with Greg Charvat

As the mystery surrounding missing Flight 370 moves into its second full week, theories continue to pour in, while data analysis becomes increasingly more critical.

As "Piers Morgan Live" continues its coverage, on Monday evening Guest Host Bill Weir will welcome Radar Expert Greg Charvat for a live, face to face primetime interview.

In advance of his appearance, the author of “Small and Short-Range Radar Systems” took some time to delve into his area of expertise, in the process posing – and then answering – some questions geared toward radars, with the entire experience being presented on the backdrop of the on-going investigation.

1. We've all seen it in our favorite World War Two movies, in laymen's terms, how does radar work?

Radar is a WW2 acronym that stands for Radio Direction And Ranging (RADAR). A radar consists of a radio transmitter and a radio receiver.

Imagine that we can turn on and off a radio transmitter at will. The radar simply measures the time it takes for the transmitted signal to travel from the transmitter, scatter off the target and travel back to the receiver:

Radar Simple Example

The total time measured is proportional to range because the speed of radio waves in air is approximately the speed of light. Range proportional to time.

Conventional radar as we may think of it provides a round image and 'blips' representing all targets within view, angle vs. range. To do this, the radar uses a directional antenna shaped like a parabola (just like a flashlight's reflector). This antenna rotates, thereby 'sweeping' the horizon. Any targets within line of sight are ranged and plotted on a screen as the antenna rotates, mapping these targets and their associated antenna angles onto a screen, providing an image of all targets around the radar:

Basic Pulsed Radar

2. We've all been pulled over once or twice. What is the difference between air traffic control radar, military radar and the radars used by law enforcement?

An air traffic control radar, such as the ASR-9, operates out to ranges of approximately 60 nmi. It's job is to locate and track commercial and civil aircraft. It follows a similar architecture to the figure above.

By contrast, a law enforcement radar is a small short-range device operating out to 100-200m that simply provides the velocity of anything within its field of view. You point it like a flashlight beam, the speed of the fastest and brightest target within that invisible radar beam is displayed. These radars are not capable of ranging nor do they rotate around and plot positions of targets. They are very simple.

Military air search radars are a lot like the air traffic control radars, except that they must work out to significantly longer ranges, must be portable and often meet more rigorous specifications. Published specifications of some older military radar devices (for large aircraft) are on the order of 150 to 200 nautical miles or greater.

There are many more radar types. As many radar types as there are radar engineers, but these are the most common.

3. Can a large aircraft like a 777 really 'fall off the radar'?

Conventional radars only detect targets within direct line of sight. Imagine placing a straight edge ruler on a basketball. Where the ruler meets the ball is the radar location. As you get further from this, the distance between the ruler and the ball surface increases. This area is where you can 'fly below the radar.' The further you are from the radar the higher you can fly to be 'below the radar.'

If the ruler is elevated slightly above the basketball, then the area below the radar is reduced to the ruler's height and where a straight line from that hits the basketball. So when installing an air-search radar sensor, be sure to place it as high as you can.

4. What limits a radar's maximum range on land?

Take a flashlight, place it on your head and turn off the lights in a room. Rotate your body. Whatever you see bouncing off that light beam is within your line of site, this is similar to how a radar 'sees' the world. What if there is a large sofa or other obstacle in the way, can you see around it? No. In fact, there is a shadow behind that object. This is the shadow zone. Radars can be shadowed by obstacles too, like mountains, buildings, etc. It takes planning to locate radar sensors in the right locations for optimum coverage. If blind spots exist, you must add more radar sensors or be willing to work with the blind spots.

Tune in this evening at 9 for Charvat's full interview with Weir. And, for more of the work presented by tonight's guest, check out his book, and follow "Mr. Vacuum Tube" on twitter.
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March 14th, 2014
10:19 PM ET

Could Flight 370 have been sabotaged from within the cabin? Experts say yes

As the mystery surrounding missing Flight 370 passes the one week mark, information and data continues to trickle in. As such, theories and hypotheticals continue to mount up.

On Friday evening Piers Morgan welcomed David Soucie and, as the host was heading to the first commercial break, his guest presented a unique possibility, one that for the first time thus far takes the emphasis off of the cockpit, and re-positions it onto the aircraft's cabin.

As "Piers Morgan Live" returned for its second block, Morgan asked Soucie to further elaborate.

"There's a hatch that goes down into the equipment area which is the Avionics Bay, or E & E, is what it's referred to as. With a special screwdriver – what it takes – you can open the hatch, you can crawl down into this area, and from inside of there is where all the circuit breakers are for all of the equipment that we've been talking about that's turned off, and even more could be turned off from down there. So that's the access," explained the author of "Why Planes Crash." "Finally I have an answer in my head as to why and how this could have occurred. Now, why it occurred I don't know, but I can tell you how." FULL POST

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